International RelationsWestern Social Science

Eligible Political Science Courses

 

Eligible 3000 Level Political Science Courses

3200E - Understanding September 11th

In what ways were the attacks of September 11th significant? This question is examined primarily using the 2001-2002 responses to the event of international relations theorists. Associated themes include "Terrorism", "Anti-Americanism", "American Exceptionalism", "Imperialism", "Legitimacy", "Democracy", "Globalization" and "International Law". 2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 393E if taken in 2006-07 and 2007-08.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


3201F/G - Issues in International Law

This course explores the political implications of international law. It examines competing approaches and considers the nature of international law. International law is discussed in the context of contemporary issues, including dispute settlement, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, international impunity, the law of the sea, and human rights.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3345E, the former Political Science 3330E, 390F if taken in 2006-07, 415E if taken in 2007-2008.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


3203F/G - Critical Approaches to Global Security

This course interrogates global security issues through critical approaches, including feminist, Marxist and Gramscian, post-modern, environmentalist and post-colonial. It examines key dominant issues, such as nuclear weapons, but also alternative issues, such as racism in security policies, indigenous peoples’ security, masculinity and warfare, and capitalism and the military-industrial complex.
Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 3355F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.
Corequisite(s):  
Pre-or Corequisite(s):  
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course.

3205F/G - Africa in World Politics

Africa is growing in importance in International Relations. The place of Africa in world politics will be examined using the writings of prominent (mostly African) international relations theorists. As part of this, we will examine the ideas of ‘Africa’, the state, power, imperialism, legitimacy, institutions, and colonialism.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3390F if taken in 2012-13 or 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course.

3206F/G - Political Risk Assessment

Policy makers in business and government have a need to understand political risks faced in the various countries where they operate. The course uses contemporary cases to evaluate the major theories of political risk assessment to provide students with the tools needed to understand this increasingly important industry.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3411F/G if taken in 2013-14 or 2014-15.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2701E AND enrolment in 3rd or 4th year Political Science or International Relations or permission from the Department.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course


3207F/G - Women, Sex, and Politics

This course explores the politics of gender, race, class and sexuality in global contexts by introducing students to the political history of women's movements, feminist political debates, political theories of gender inequality, and critical analyses of gender representations in political and social media.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3421F/G if taken in 2013-14 or 2014-15.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2237E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


3208F/G - Global Climate-Change Politics

This course explores international climate change negotiations, the evolution of multilevel climate governance, and the factors that shape policy outcomes. Topics include: history of climate negotiations; negotiating positions of key countries and their domestic policy; global political dynamics and policy debates; and the role of leadership, norms, discourse and persuasion.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3314E if taken in 2014-15 or earlier.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2702E or the former 2701E.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


3209F/G - Foreign Policy Analysis

This course explores the dynamics of foreign policy creation with emphasis on the Canadian context. We will examines who creates foreign policy, how it is implemented, and critically assess policy documents and outcomes. This will include discussion of issues such as counterterrorism, humanitarianism, militarization, trade, financial governance and bilateral negotiations.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3401F/G if taken in 2013-14 or 2014-15, the former Political Science 3333E.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


3314E - Global Environmental Governance

This course explores the theory and practice of global environmental governance. It offers a comprehensive overview of existing international policy on various ecological issues such as climate change. Through classroom simulations of global negotiations, students will analyze the political, economic, and social factors that shape outcomes in environmental politics.

Antirequisite(s): Global Environmental Politics offered as the former Political Science 455G in 2005-06 and 455F in 2006-07, Political Science 3379F/G
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


3317F/G - Interest Groups and Social Movements

An analytical study of interest groups and social movements. Topics include: theoretical approaches to interest group formation; the role of groups and movements in the policy-making process; their effectiveness as agents of democratic representation. Particular attention will be paid to the role of interest groups in Canada.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3338E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2230E or 2234E or 2244E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.


3321F/G - Politics of India

An introduction to the politics and history of the world's largest functioning democracy. India's experience provides insight into the political process of a poor, developing country with a long history of colonialism that successfully constructed a constitutional government, republican in principle and parliamentary in institutional terms.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2701E.


3322F/G - Latin America in Global Perspective

An introduction to the political economy of Modern Latin America examines how the continuing interactions between foreign and domestic economic forces have shaped Latin American politics. It explores what is distinctive in the region about the present dynamics and processes associated with globalization.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E or 2231E, or History 2501E or Anthropology 2216F/G, or International Relations 2701E.


3323F/G - The Politics of Latin America

Major themes have dominated discussions of the politics of Latin America, including populism, revolutionary struggle, military rule, democracy and participation, social movements and the quest for meaningful citizenship. A number of country-case studies highlight continuities and changes in the contemporary politics of the region.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E or 2231E, or History 2501E or Anthropology 2216F/G, or International Relations 2701E.


Political Science 3324F/G - Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science

This course introduces students to a range of methodological approaches to questions in political science. Students will become familiar with qualitative and quantitative data sources and ways of using each to address political issues.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Honors Political Science, Honors Specialization in Political Science, or Major in Political Science.


3326E - Canadian-American Relations

This course examines the Canadian-American relationship by looking back to how it developed and ahead to what it might become, especially after NAFTA. Topics include communications, culture, trade and investment, immigration, security, the environment and extra-continental relations. Approaches include economic history, political economy, political integration and public choice.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3367F/G
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2230E or 2231E or 2244E or International Relations 2701E


3328F/G - Political Development in the Muslim World

TThis half-course in comparative politics introduces the Muslim world through a few select case studies of Muslim majority countries of Asia and Africa, and explores the challenges, difficulties and problems of "old societies and new states" making transition to democracy and meeting the demands of globalization.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E


3329F/G - The Politics of the Middle East

This half-course in comparative politics introduces the Middle East in world politics and explores the issues relating to political and economic development, war and peace in the region through the second-half of the twentieth century to present times.

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 2243E (Main Campus), the former Political Science 2143E (King's College), and Political Science 2243E (King's College)
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.


3340F/G - The Rise and Fall of Communism in the USSR and Eastern Europe

Communism had a great impact on the politics and history of Europe and parts of Asia in the twentieth century. This course explores the form of communism which turned the collapsing Russian empire into the USSR, spread to Eastern Europe after World War Two and eventually collapsed in 1989-91.

Antirequisite(s): History 3419F/G
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.


3341F/G - The Post Communist Transformations

The collapse of communism in Europe had a profound impact on countries where the ideology had dominated. It also ended the bipolar international system and ushered in a new era in international relations. This course examines domestic, regional, international and transnational dimensions of these transformations.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.


3343F/G - European Union: The Politics of Integration

This course will survey the sources in history of European integration, the institutions and policy-making approaches that have resulted from these developments, and the extent to which the European Union has moved in a state-like or democratic direction and will do so in the future.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.


3344F/G - Western European Politics: States, Nations, and Regimes

This course provides a detailed introduction to Western European politics, with an emphasis upon Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. Topics include: state and nation formation, early experiences of autocratic and parliamentary rule, the sources and nature of post-WWII democracies, and the recent resurgence of nationalism and regionalism.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science2248E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.


3351E - Theories of the State

A seminar on theories of the nature and role of the modern state. Topics for discussion may include theories of state formation, pluralist, individualist and neo-Marxist views of the state, and the question of state autonomy in relation to economic and social formations.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2247E


3352E - Advanced International Politics

A seminar course treating theoretical aspects of international politics in the light of substantive material. The seminar will consider a selection of normative doctrines, conceptual frameworks, and theoretical propositions concerning various modes of international action and interaction, organization, and integration and evaluate these in application to contemporary world politics.

Prerequisite(s): P Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


3365F/G - Political Economy - North South

This course examines the nature of relations between developing and industrialized states with special focus on such issues as development, aid, trade, investment, food and agriculture.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3358F/G, 3357E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2211E or Economics 1020


3366E - International Conflict Management

An examination of theories and strategies of international conflict and conflict management, including the causes of war, arms control, and various methods of reducing or eliminating conflict.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


3367F/G - Political Economy: North America

An examination of the impact of North American economic and social integration on Canada/U.S. relations. Consideration is given to the applicability of various theories of political integration and economic interdependence to the case of Canada and the United States.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, or International Relations 2701E.


3388E - International Human Rights

This course will provide an overview of the topic of human rights, from its origins to its 21st century reality, to its various conceptions, theoretical notions, and instruments. It will look at issues of concern, abuses and potential solutions.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 2219E, the former 209E offered 2001 to 2004 at Huron.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or 2245E or International Relations 2701E.


3390F: Africa in World Politics

Africa is growing in importance in International Relations. In this course we will examine the place of Africa in world politics. This will be done by applying the writings of prominent international relations theorists to about a dozen case studies involving African states. The states chosen reflect the diversity of situations (including problems and opportunities) that exist on the continent. As part of this, we will examine the concept of ‘Africa’ itself, along with ideas about the state, power, imperialism, legitimacy, international institutions, and colonialism.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 2219E, the former 209E offered 2001 to 2004 at Huron.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


3391G: Understanding the State

What is the nature and role of the state? In spite of its centrality to all areas of the discipline, the state remains difficult to fathom and deeply controversial. We continue to struggle to define the state, we sidelined the state for a significant period, and we have recently opened up new debates about the extent of its marginalization. This course will aim, first, to familiarize students with the development of the state in political theory and history; second, to engage with the centrally important debates amongst pluralists, elitists, Marxists, post-structuralists, feminists, and others over the relationship of the state to the sources of social power; and, third, to explore the changing status of the state within the discipline of political science, from behaviouralism to ‘bringing the state back in’ and now to globalization and governance theory.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3351E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, or 2237E, or 2245E or International Relations 2701E.


3396G: The Politics of Foreign Aid

This seminar course offers a broad survey of the international politics of foreign aid. Specifically, we will examine the use of official development assistance as a foreign policy tool as well as the wide variety of international actors involved in the allocation of foreign aid. The course seeks to understand the motivations behind the giving of aid as well as the impact of foreign aid in recipient countries. Several themes in the political economy of development will be addressed including economic growth, governance, democracy promotion, human rights, conflict, and climate change. Students will learn about the benefits and harms associated with foreign aid from a variety of perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231 or Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2701E AND Political Science 3324F/G


3397F: Current Affairs in World Politics

This course explores contemporary issues in world politics through active student engagement. Students will examine world politics “as it happens” through news in the mass media, and conduct a “reality check” by testing academic concepts and theories of international relations against current affairs. Theoretical topics include sources of power, the use of force versus diplomacy, the role of international institutions, morality and ethics in world politics, and the interplay between domestic politics and international relations. The course emphasizes class discussions and political analysis in international security, global political economy, environmental politics and human rights.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3352E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


3401F: Topics dealing with Canadian Foreign Policy

This course will help you critically assess Canadian Foreign Policy and explain the changes in policy over time. We will emphasize the different actors in the creation of foreign policy, as well as specific policies, their implantation and outcomes. We will address a range of perspectives and debates about the creation of foreign policy and address issues such as human security, trade relations, war, sovereignty and immigration. This course has three main objectives. First, this course is designed to outline and allow you to assess the perspectives and issues that shape the context and creation of Canadian Foreign Policy. This will provide a foundation for any future interests in Canadian and International Relations and establish a foundation for future research in areas and topics that are of interest to you. Second, the assignments in this course are designed to help you develop your critical thinking in ways that relate to specific issues and events in Canadian Foreign Policy. While we will cover a range of debates and issues, you need to decide which you find most interesting and which you will focus on in your work. Third, by the conclusion of this course you should be able to provide a critical and original argument about Canadian Foreign Policy.


3411F/G: Special Topics in IR/Comparative Politics

Political Risk Assessment.

Antirequisite(s):
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E OR Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2701E AND enrolment in 3rd or 4th year Political Science or International Relations, or permission of the Department for students not registered in those programs.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Political Science 3501F: Great Debates in International Relations

The theoretical study of international relations has been shaped over the years by enduring ideas of political philosophers, historians, economists and practitioners of the diplomatic craft. In this course a few of the dominant ideas and themes in international relations study, and the legacy of major thinkers, will be discussed. This is a half-credit course, and every effort will be made to divide time between lectures and seminar discussions on the weekly readings and recommended texts.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3352E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


Political Science 3502G: Theoretical Approaches to World Politics

Theoretical approaches to the study of international relations need to be tested and evaluated in the context of world politics through study of events, and how major global events have shaped the international system. In this course the evolution of the post-Cold War international system, of what it means or represents, will be analytically discussed through examination of some key events and issues. This is a half-course credit, and every effort will be made to divide time between lectures and seminar discussions on the weekly readings and recommended texts.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3352E
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


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Eligible 4000 Level Political Science Courses

4201F/G - The UN and Global Governance

The seminar examines current issues before the United Nations and assesses the organization's contributions to the resolution of diverse global problems. It assesses the UN's objectives, structure and decision-making procedures and evaluates current UN policies and activities on a range of contemporary issues. Current proposals for reform are assessed.

Antirequisite(s): >The former Political Science 3345E, 417F if taken in 2006-07, 415E if taken in 2004-05, 2005-06, 2007-2008.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


4202F/G - Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective

This course studies the interaction between religion and politics in Canada, the United States and Latin America. More specifically, the course examines the political relationship between church and state, and the religious foundation of political culture in these three cases.

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 460G if taken in 2004-05, 2005-06, 2007-08
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E


4206F/G - Theories of Global Justice

A seminar on the main approaches to, and debates about, issues of global justice in contemporary political theory. Topics may include cosmopolitan ethics, the causes of global inequality, social and economic rights, and ideas of global citizenship and national responsibility.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3396F/G if taken in 2004-05; Political Science 3397F/G if taken in 2006-07; the former Political Science 3346E; the former Political Science 4463F/G if taken in 2010-11 or 2011-12.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2237E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course


4207F/G - Models of Democracy

Democracy is a central concept in politics. Different theoretical understandings of 'democracy' will be examined, and discussed with reference to current and practical political issues involving Canada and the United States. Related ideas include legitimacy, representation, capitalism, imperialism, liberalism, republicanism, and the state.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 4413F/G if taken in 2012-13 or   2013-14
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2237E plus one of Political Science 2230E, 2231E, 2244E, or 2245E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 hours, 1.0 course

4401F/G - American Foreign Policy

Contemporary theories and models of foreign policy decision making will be used to explain U.S. political, economic and security relations. Selected case studies will highlight the many domestic and external factors thought to be responsible for influencing America's conduct in the international community.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E and Political Science 2244E


4402F/G - Diplomacy and International Negotiations

The course explores contemporary international diplomacy. Topics include: foreign policy institutions, treaty-making processes, diplomatic protocol, logistics of negotiations and their influence on political outcomes, and the role of power, strategy and cultural differences. Students engage in realistic classroom simulations of multilateral negotiations, role-play diplomats and gain practical bargaining experience.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 4457F/G if taken in 2012-13 or    2013-14
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course

4403F/G - War on Terror

This course investigates network-centric warfare and the changing nature
of 'war' from a theoretical standpoint. Students will examine the concept of 'terror' both as an historical phenomenon, and as part of a new kind of globalized phenomenon within the context of the ' global war on terror'.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 4464F/G if taken in 2012-13 or 2013-14
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2237E
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 2 hours, 1.0 course

4404F/G - Globalization and National Sovereignty

The course is aimed to assess the impact of global interactions on the viability of the nation state. Some sessions will review global flows of capital, goods, services, technology, migration and communications and assess their effects on the capacity of national governments to exercise traditional instruments of national policy. Others will examine the extent to which these developments require a reconsideration of conventional theoretical perspectives on the state and international relations.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


4406F/G - The European Welfare State

Is the European welfare state on the way out, or are the reports of its death greatly exaggerated? This seminar will deal with the status of the contemporary welfare state, within the context of its history, social and ideological foundations, and relationship to questions of citizenship, economic development, and European integration.


4408F/G - International Security

This course overviews current threats to international security such as nuclear weapons proliferation, terrorism, environmental degradation, and ethnic conflict. It also considers various approaches to alleviating these problems including UN peace support operations, regional alliances, espionage, arms control, and disarmament.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E.


4409F/G - The United States and the Middle East

The course explores the complex relationship between the United States and the Middle East, particularly since the establishment of Israel and the making of new states in the region. It will focus primarily on how the United States views and came to occupy a defining role in the region's politics.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701 and Political Science 2244E.


4411F/G - Threats to Global Democracy

This course examines threats to democratic regimes. Why do some democracies succeed while others fail? We explore theory and specific countries to address topics include the state of global democracy, the definition and measurement of democracy and the influences of economics, institutions, militaries, society and international actors on democratization.
Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 3347F/G if taken in 2011-12; Political Science 3390F/G if taken in 2010-11; the former Political Science 397F/G if taken in 2006-07 and Political Science 392E if taken in 2007-08.
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2701E.
Corequisite(s):  
Pre-or Corequisite(s):  
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course.

4413G: Models of Democracy

Democracy is a central concept in politics. In this course we will examine different theoretical understandings of ‘democracy’. Our guide for this will be the historian and theorist David Held. We will use his book “Models of Democracy” and readings from other writers to discuss a variety of ‘models’ of democracy from Ancient Greece to recent conceptions (e.g. Deliberative Democracy) and global conceptions (Cosmopolitan Democracy). As part of this, we will examine ideas that have been associated with ‘democracy’, including legitimacy, representation, capitalism, imperialism, liberalism, republicanism, and the state. We will make reference to existing democracies, particularly Canada, but also the U.S. and European democracies. This course builds on courses in political theory, Canadian government, American government, comparative politics, and international relations courses.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2237E plus one of Political Science 2230E, 2231E, 2244E, or 2245E


4417F: Economic and Humanitarian Interventions

This seminar course seeks to explain when and how international actors intervene in the domestic politics and economies of countries. We address both the theory and application of various forms of international intervention including: bilateral foreign aid; multilateral foreign aid; sanctions; structural adjustment policies; and, humanitarian intervention. Key questions that are raised include: what factors motivate international intervention? What are the responsibilities of the interveners and the rights of the intervened upon? Who does international intervention benefit? The goal of the course is to provide an understanding of the broad nature of international intervention in global politics while grounding theoretical arguments in case-specific investigations. The seminar format will involve discussion of the theoretical material as well as relevant current events.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 4404F/G
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


4426F/G - Genocide

The course examines the theoretical and methodological issues related to the topic of genocide and considers empirical cases of genocide and genocidal acts, such as "ethnic cleansing." The course begins by looking at the definition of genocide, then moves to discuss more recent cases of genocides and genocidal acts.

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 413G taken in 2003-04, 459F taken in 2005-06 or 2006-07
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 3388E


4427F/G - Transitional Justice

TThis course aims to critically examine a number of the approaches to and difficulties with efforts in transitional justice and post-conflict social reconstruction.

Antirequisite(s): Selected Topics course Justice After Atrocity offered as the former Political Science 414G taken in 2003-04, 456G in 2004-05, 461G in 2005-06 or 2006-07
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 3388E


4455F - Gender and the Challenges of Transnational Politics

This course explores the challenge posed by feminist and critical theory to the study of transnational politics. It proceeds through cross-cultural and historical comparisons to discuss the centrality of gender to three processes: work and migration; citizenship and human rights; and indigenous mobilizations.


4457G: Diplomacy and International Negotiations

This course explores the theory and practice of United Nations diplomacy and international negotiations. Theoretically, it examines how the process affects outcomes in world politics and explores the role of leadership, collective action problems, issue linkage, argumentation strategy, language translation, cultural differences and domestic politics. The course offers intimate knowledge of global politics behind closed doors. Students will engage in realistic classroom simulations and develop expertise on the process and political dynamics of multilateral negotiations.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 4201F/G
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701E


4498F/G - Independent Study

Individual reading and research at an advanced level under faculty supervision. Students are responsible for arranging independent study credit with an individual faculty member. 0.5 Course.

Prerequisite(s): Written permission of instructor and department and a minimum 80% average the previous year.


4499F/G - Independent Study

Individual reading and research at an advanced level under faculty supervision. Students are responsible for arranging independent study credit with an individual faculty member. 0.5 Course.

Prerequisite(s): Written permission of instructor and department and a minimum 80% average the previous year.


4511F/G - Global Economic Governance Beyond 2015

Prerequisite(s):Political Science 2231E OR Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2702E, or the former International Relations 2701E AND enrolment in 3rd or 4th year Political Science or International Relations, or permission of the Department for students not registered in those programs.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


4512F - Comparative Global Corruption

Prerequisite(s):Political Science 2231E OR Political Science 2245E or International Relations 2702E, or the former International Relations 2701E AND enrolment in 3rd or 4th year Political Science or International Relations, or permission of the Department for students not registered in those programs.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


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