Eligible History Courses

 

Eligible 3000 Level History Courses

3230E - Transnational Canada, 1815 to Present

This course takes a thematic approach to examine the impact of transnationalism on Canadian history in the 19th and 20th centuries. A transnational history of Canada both challenges and complements national histories and transcends traditional borders by situating ideas, peoples, and events in connected networks and in a global context. Extra Information: 3 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.


3320E - Global America: The United States in World Affairs, 1700 to the present

Throughout its history the United States has imagined itself as a global project. To better understand America’s role in the world and the impact of international developments on the United States, this seminar explores the political, economic, military, and cultural dimensions of U.S. interaction with the world since the 18th century. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3319E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3326F/G - Atomic America: The United States During the 1950s

This seminar examines some key aspects of political, social, and cultural life in the United States during the 1950s. Topics include social classes, urban and suburban growth, family and gender relations, McCarthyism, and civil rights movements. The impact and legacy of events and issues of the 1950s are evaluated. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3396F/G if taken in 2011-2012
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3412F/G - Britain's Sailors, Soldiers, and Empire: 1689-1902

This course examines the emergence of Britain as an imperial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the military means by which that empire was acquired (and lost). It explores both soldiers' and sailors' lives and the effects of war on state formation and national identity within Britain. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3415E - Modern Germany, 1815 to the Present

An examination of the conflict between liberalism and reaction in the nineteenth century; the effects of industrialization; unification and its consequences; the causes and consequences of the First World War; the rise of Nazism and the nature of Nazi rule; the post-war German states; and Germany in the post-unification era. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3417E - Russia

An emphasis on intellectual history in a context of political, social, and economic changes from the eighteenth century to 1921. Broad topics will include the first and second European enlightenments, conservative thought, populism, anarchism, and Marxism. The Revolutions of 1917 will be treated intensively. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3418F/G - Representations of the Past in Eastern Europe and Russia

This course looks at how history has been constructed, used, and misused to justify the existence of imperial and modern national projects in Eastern Europe and Russia. The focus will be on Russia, Poland and Ukraine, on both political and cultural factors, and how these processes changed over time. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3419F/G - The Rise and Fall of Communism in the USSR and Eastern Europe

Europe Communism had a great impact on the politics and history of Europe and parts of Asia in the twentieth century. This course explores the form of communism which turned the collapsing Russian empire into the USSR, spread to Eastern Europe after World War Two and eventually collapsed in 1989-91. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 439E, Political Science 3340F/G, the former Political Science 249E.
Prerequisite(s): History 1401E or Political Science 2231E or 2245E or International Relations 2701E.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3420F/G - The Soviet Experiment

The rise and fall of the Soviet Union had a profound impact on European and global affairs. Yet for many, Russia remains an enigma. This course examines the politics, economics, social issues, cultures and religions of the peoples who lived in the USSR, Russians and non-Russians, and how they interacted. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 439E.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3421E - History of European International Relations: Communities and Conflicts

This course examines major conflicts, key personalities, alliances, challenges to the nation-state, relations with the world beyond Europe, and the evolution of Europe’s international relations from the mid-19th century to the present. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3422F/G - Ever Closer? The European Union in Historical Context

This course explores the historical roots of European integration. The first half of the twentieth century brought unprecedented destruction to Europe; the postwar years witnessed the construction of a successful supranational organization, the European Union (EU). We will explain this apparently dramatic reversal and the end of fierce inter-state rivalry. 2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3496F/G taken in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011.
Prerequisite(s): History 1403E and 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3427E - The Holocaust

This course explores the evolution of the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” in the broader context of German and Jewish history and anti-Semitic ideologies. The Holocaust is analyzed from the perspective of the perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The ultimate goal is to enable students to understand how and why the Holocaust happened. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 394E if taken in 2006-07.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3429F/G - Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe

This seminar analyses the forces unleashed upon Europe by the French Revolution, examining 25 years of radical proclamations, unprecedented initiatives, recurrent conflicts, and reactions.  Our focus will be the relations between France and its neighbours - placing these fiery decades in a trans-national context to understand their impact upon Europe. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3431F/G - Cities, Spaces and Minority Identities in Modern Europe: The Experiences of Jews and Muslims

This course focuses on the role of the city and urban spaces in the lives of religious and ethnic minorities in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries. In particular, we will explore the experiences of Jews and Muslims in European society, as well as interactions between the two communities.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3513F/G - Cuban Revolution
(This course was the former Selected Topic: History 3596F/G as taken in 2011-12)

The Cuban Revolution was a seminal event in the history of the modern world. This 3rd year seminar course is intended to introduce students to the ongoing debate on the merits of the Revolution; to study the Cuban Revolution and its legacy from the Cuban point of view and, to introduce students to primary and secondary Latin American sources. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3601E - Chinese Nationalism in History

A thematic exploration of the crucial developments and problems in Chinese history since 1800. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3603E - Modern Japan: Nation, Society, and Culture

Traces the historical development of Japan from 1600 to the present, with an emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural factors that influenced these changes. The impact of these developments on Japanese society and Japan’s role in the international system will also be assessed. 2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 1601E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3605E - Crusaders & Moslems in the Twelfth Century

Aspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3607F/G - Cold War East Asia

This course investigates the domestic and international factors affecting the East Asian regional system during the Cold War period. Topics may include the U.S. occupation of Japan, Japan’s external relations with the U.S.A., U.S.S.R. and China, the rise of communist China, the Cultural Revolution, and the division of Korea. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3608F/G - Israel: People, Politics and Culture

It is rare that a week goes by without Israel making it into the news, frequently on the front pages. Religious, geo-political and historical factors have propelled the tiny state to a place of international prominence. This class seeks to introduce students to the people, politics and culture of contemporary Israel. Despite the impression that the popular media presents of a homogenous Jewish society, especially in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Israel is in fact very diverse and even fragmented. The course introduces students to the varied nature of Israeli culture. In the first classes, we begin briefly with an historical overview of Zionist ideology, the legacy of the British Mandate, and life in the region before the establishment of the State of Israel. From there, we will explore the critical divisions within Israeli society, including tensions between secular and religious Jews, between Jews and Arabs, and between Mizrachim/Sephardim and Ashkenazim. We will discuss how these divisions have influenced and shaped the society, the idea of a Jewish state, and the visions of its future.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3609F/G - Japan since 1945

Selected topics, such as Japan's phenomenal economic growth, its competitive drive for the control of world markets, big business in politics, the debates on the Constitutional revision and remilitarization, student radicalism and the changing roles of women in contemporary Japan, are examined. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3611E - Empire, Conflict, and Diplomacy in the Asia-Pacific

An investigation of historical developments within the international system in the Asia-Pacific and the region's interactions with the wider world, mainly concentrating on the 19th and 20th centuries. 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 396E if taken in 2007-08.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3613F/G - The Koreas since 1945

This course will investigate developments in North and South Korea since 1945. Topics will include the Korean War; economic development, military dictatorship, and democratisation in South Korea; the consolidation of the Kim family state in North Korea; and the role of the Korean peninsula in international relations in the Asia-Pacific. 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3701E - Slavery and Abolition in the Atlantic World

This course explores the rise of modern slavery, the Atlantic Slave Trade, the experience of enslavement, the relationship between bound labour and plantation agriculture, the emergence of abolitionist/antislavery activism and the process of Emancipation. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3702F/G - Slavery, Resistance, and Emancipation in the Carribean

This course explores the rise of modern slavery, the Atlantic Slave Trade, the experience of enslavement, the relationship between bound labour and plantation agriculture, the emergence of abolitionist/antislavery activism and the process of Emancipation. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3701E

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3703E - Delhi and London: Imperial Cities

Delhi and London were two major cities of the British Empire. This course studies their parallel destinies, from the imperial into the post-colonial world. It explores how diverse cultural, political, and migratory flows connected and shaped these cities. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3709E - Iberian Empires: Portugal, Spain, and their American Colonies in a Global Context, 1400-1810

This course will examine the history and legacy of Portugal, Spain and their American colonies in a global context. It will focus on the political, economic, social, geographic, scientific and technological factors that contributed to the formation and development of the first European transatlantic empires. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3715F/G - The Pursuit of Peace in the Transatlantic World, 1815-1991

This international history course examines how individuals, states, and non-state actors have tried to create a peaceful world order. We will study peace settlements, the ideas of peace activists and policymakers, cooperation and conflict amongst states, as well as the relationship between war and peace. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3717G - The Global Cold War

This seminar examines the development of the Cold War from its ideological and political origins to its sudden, and arguably unexpected, end. It traces the evolution of the conflict from Europe to Asia to Africa, concluding with an assessment of how this geopolitical conflict has defined the modern world. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3797F/G, if taken in 2010-11, 2012-13, 2013-14.

2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


3722F/G - Killing Fields: Genocide in Modern History

This seminar explores the causes, elements, and consequences of genocide in modern history through historical case studies and multidisciplinary perspectives. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


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Eligible 4000 Level History Courses

History 4208F/G - Canada and the Age of Conflict, 1896-1945

"Modern" Canada was largely shaped between 1896 and 1945, decades that witnessed a massive immigration boom, two world wars, and an economic depression. This upper-year seminar course will examine such issues as politics, war, regionalism, culture, gender, sexuality, modernity, class, race, ethnicity, religion, industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, foreign affairs, and age/generation. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): History 4207E

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4301E - The United States in the Twentieth Century

A survey of American history, 1901 to the present, with emphasis upon political, social, and economic developments. Intensive examination of selected topics in seminar.  2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4412E - The Tudors and the Stuarts: Early Modern England

This course considers the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, 1485-1714. Areas covered include the political and religious: how radical was the English reformation, how ‘glorious’ the revolution of 1688? Cultural topics will also be integral. What rituals dominated people’s lives? How riotous were the English? 2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 495E (2004-2008), The former History 4493E (2008-2010).
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4492E - Selected Topics in European History: The Second World War and the Nazi Occupation of Europe, 1938-1945

This course will focus predominantly on the Nazi occupation of Europe from 1938 to 1945. It will examine the differences between the Nazi occupations of Western and Eastern Europe. Within this framework, we will also discuss issues of resistance and collaboration, the exploitation of prisoners of war and slave labour, and the relationship between occupation policies and the Holocaust. In addition, this course will examine the early phase of the Allied occupation of Germany as we explore how the occupiers became the occupied. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4501F/G - The First Multicultural Experiment: Imposition, Adoption and Adaptation in Spanish and Portuguese America 1490-1800

This course examines the Portuguese and Spanish American empires (1492-1800) concentrating on the transfer of European ideologies and institutions and on the subjugated peoples' ability to adopt, adapt and reject their new circumstances. It also includes the important role of women of all races played in a multicultural society. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4603F/G - Silk Roads and Spice Routes: Ancient and Medieval Asia and World Contacts

This course will investigate the economic, political, religious, cultural, and technological impact of long distance land and sea trade between Asia and other world regions in ancient and medieval times up to around 1500. 1 lecture hour, 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4607G - History of Women and Gender Relations in Africa

In the past African women were powerful leaders, strong economic contributors and respected members of their extended families. This course will examine these historical roles as well as factors that undermined African women's status and changed gender relations, such as slavery, economic forces and colonialism. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 4607F/G.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 courses in History or Women's Studies, taken at the 2200 level or above if they are History courses or at the 2000 level or above if they are Women's Studies courses.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4701E - Canada and the United States

This course analyses and compares a variety of themes which have been important in the development of both Canadian and American society. It also examines the involved and often difficult relationship of Canada and the United States, with an emphasis on the patterns of political, social, economic and military interaction. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.
Extra Information: Restricted to Honors Students

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4709E - The First World War: A Revolutionary Experience

This research-intensive course is intended to provide an examination of selected aspects of the First World War, including its origins and aftermath, in a variety of combatant nations. Among the themes to be discussed are the alliance system, the experience of battle, conflicts on the home front, social factors, strategic and tactical decision-making, and the memory of the war. Students will have an opportunity to debate the most contentious historiographical issues surrounding the war and use a wide range of primary-source materials, both in discussions and assignments. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.
Extra Information: Restricted to Honors Students

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4720E - The Vietnam Wars: Between Decolonization and the Cold War

This upper level seminar explores the Vietnam Wars from both a Vietnamese and western perspective, and considers these conflicts in the light of the two great forces that shaped the international system at the mid-point of the twentieth century: Decolonization and the Cold War. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4805E - Warfare

Selected topics in the history of warfare. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 497E if taken in 2005-06.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.
Extra Information: This course may be counted as a principal course in the honors Political Science program. Restricted to Honors Students

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4813E - Smallpox to SARS: Disease and Medicine in History

This course examines a variety of 19th and 20th century disease outbreaks – including smallpox, tuberculosis, influenza, HIV-AIDS and SARS – to discuss how these outbreaks affected political, economic and social structures. We shall also explore debates surrounding medical technology, disease campaigns, human experimentation and the HPV vaccine. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 493E if taken in 2004-05, 2007-08, former History 4205E.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program


4901E - Directed Readings in History

The subject will be selected by students in consultation with an instructor of their choice willing to give the course. This course will normally be open only to fourth-year honors students who have achieved an average of at least 80% in their third-year history courses. 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department.
Extra Information: Restricted to Honors Students.


4902F/G - Directed Readings in History

The subject will be selected by students in consultation with an instructor of their choice willing to give the course. This course will normally be open only to fourth-year honors students who have achieved an average of at least 80% in their third year history courses. 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department.
Extra Information: Restricted to Honors Students.


4903E - Senior Thesis

This course will normally be open only to fourth-year honors students who have achieved an average of at least 80% in their third-year history courses. 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to Fourth Year Honors History Students. Permission of the Chair is also required.


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